Author Topic: daughter  (Read 2720 times)

sadintexas

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daughter
« on: March 14, 2015, 09:20:44 PM »
My daughter is 19 getting married. Still in college..Plans to move to Washington and I am in Texas (he's in the army)  I am having such a hard time accepting that soon she'll be farther away from me then she's ever been. I can hardly talk about it or think about it without crying.. All I can think about is how many months will it be before I can actually see my daughter again? What if they have kids and I hardly ever get to see them? I wasn't prepared to feel this overwhelmed with sadness. It's like I'm also grieving for her childhood which is gone. I'm sure I'm being a normal Mom, but the pain feels so much worse then I even anticipated.  It's bothering me so much I can hardly sleep. Thanks for listening. If anyone has suggestions on how you coped, or how long it takes before you get adjusted to their being away I'd like to hear from you. Thanks.

Tom

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Re: daughter
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2015, 07:45:34 PM »
Hi sadintexas -  It's a tough time when kids move far away.  Very tough.  Can you skype with her?  I remember that helped me a great deal in a similar situation. 
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Terry

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    • “Grief is like the ocean; it comes on waves ebbing and flowing. Sometimes the water is calm, and sometimes it is overwhelming. All we can do is learn to swim.” –Vicki Harrison
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Re: daughter
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2015, 12:13:00 PM »

Hi sadintexas,

There are some wonderful books on the Empty Nest Syndrome. I like the Chicken Soup books and they have one on this subject. One is available for download on Kindle or to any tablet or smartphone. The title is "Chicken Soup for the Soul: Empty Nesters: 101 Stories about Surviving and Thriving When the Kids Leave Home"

There are many articles on the net, too that may be helpful to you. I would start a new hobby....stay busy until the worst passes. Maybe someone reading your post can offer some advice if they have also experienced this sadness. Keep posting your feelings....we're listening.

Holding good thoughts for you.

Love,
Terry

sadintexas

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Re: daughter
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2015, 08:26:43 PM »
The hard part is that she is my best friend.. I do know I need to let her find her life the same as my mom let me. I just wish she could be closer. I just hope I do not fill this way long.

Terry

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Re: daughter
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2015, 07:01:06 PM »
It's hard to let go, but.....

Thinking of you and sending hugs. :icon_flower:
Terry


sadintexas

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Re: daughter
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2015, 07:06:57 AM »
Thanks

vencelylalas

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Re: daughter
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2015, 10:51:13 PM »
i am so agree that letting go i so hard but each person must accept this..no one has an exception for it